Author Highlight: H.T. Lyon

I have another new author lined up. This is part of a series of author interviews. Please check out H.T. Lyon’s website and Twitter.

How much research do you do?

That depends. For hard science fiction I do a lot. If I am trying to describe what life could be like in the near future as we (hopefully) colonise our solar system, then I want it to ring true.

There’s a lot of information available and I learned some amazing stuff. What is most interesting and challenging is when I learn something that invalidates an assumption in my story. Then there’s a little burst of creativity as I work around this. Sometimes I learn amazing stuff that I had never thought of. The immensely abrasive and damaging nature of moon dust came as a surprise and something I needed to take into account. Doing that enriches the story though. For smaller works, I’m less likely to research. Accuracy is less important than the message.

Do you think that the cover plays an important part in the buying process?

I do believe that the cover is important. Books are like any other purchase we make. We judge them against other purchases of a similar type. In indie publishing circles, the cover along with the keyword and blurb is probably one of the biggest marketing tools. And for most genres, covers have a look and feel that readers expect. If the cover is too amateurish or has errors, it’s a massive turn off. In fact from what I understand, if you only have the money for one thing, put it into the cover! The web is a visual medium and unless your book takes off on Twitter or something, it will heavily rely on the cover the drag readers in.

How are you publishing this book and why?

I am committed to self-publishing simply because I want to retain the control of my work. That’s very important to me as I am writing to prompt readers to think about the world they live in and I want to make sure that the questions I raise stay strong and aren’t diluted by someone else in the publishing process. A second reason to self-publish is because I don’t want to spend the time and emotional energy going through the traditional publishing process. I prefer to sink that time into more writing. I simply don’t need the validation of having work traditionally published. I have a day job and I’m good at it, I get all the validation I need from that.

Would you or do you use a PR agency?

I don’t think I would use a PR agency. Not unless my work really took off. I’d much rather self-market to get a reasonable fan base and work from there. There seems to be a lot of luck in the writing business and, honestly, I don’t think it would pay off. Certainly it would have a lesser return per dollar than a good cover designer or a competent editor.

What advice would you give young readers who want to become authors?

I would say, get started. Write anything. If you like a television series, then write fan fiction but whatever you do get going. The biggest problem is fear of failure because your writing sucks. The secret is that your first draft will always suck and once you learn that, it’s all ok from there. When you do start, get support for your hobby from other writers and NOT from friends and family. Writing is a long process and non-writers don’t understand that drafts are very rough documents.

 

H.T. Lyon is a aspiring writer of science fiction. A futurist with a keen interest in where our society is heading, he focuses most of his attention on stories that examine the direction our society is taking or that shows where we could end up. Optimistic by nature, he believes that one day we will look to settle the Solar System as we outgrow our planet and some of his stories examine how this could look. Currently, he has a number of novels underway and some short stories. His aim is to get one of these up and published before the end of the year around the other commitments that exist in his life.

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Anthology from the JL

I have a story coming up in the JL Anthology.

June 17.

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What is the difference between a hero and a villain?

A hero should always use their power for good: a detective devotes his life to chasing gifted villains; a girl uses her frost powers to rescue her father; a weary sidekick faces her childhood nemesis; and a young man must protect his loved ones against a tyrannical authority.

But having unique gifts means facing tough decisions: a doctor must choose between saving his reputation or his patient; a young woman saves a drowning man and finds herself in danger as a result; a student discovers the consequences of choice; and a wannabe hero takes on a supervillain hoping she’ll be invited to the hero’s league.

And the line between good and evil is oftentimes blurred: a self-made hero crosses that line to save the world; a lovesick henchman blindly follows his master’s orders; a mentor attempts to prevent a pupil from being drawn to villainy; a superpowered military team questions their orders despite the inevitable consequences.

Follow these men and women as they set out to save themselves, and the world, from the great evils around them.

Heros

Heros are the summer theme for me.

Next month, I anticipate a short story of mine will be published in an anthology published by Rowanwood Publishing and the Just-Us League.  This is the second anthology.  The first one, From the Stories of Old, featured fairy tale retellings. The retellings were everything from the classic Rumpelstiltskin to more modern Hans Christian Anderson Little Mermaid, eastern culture tales like East of the Sun and West of the Moon, and less common stories such as my own based on the Struwwelpeter.

This second anthology is stories of heros and villains. I’m excited to introduce Madame Pain, the voodoo diva, and her nemesis the Volcano. I imagine their great battle takes place in an ancient portion of a cemetery that looks a little like this picture:

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This picture is taken from the Ghost Diaries and their blog about the most dangerous cemeteries

My hero and villain battle it out over the most common of all causes, love. Believe it or not, despite the terrifying cemetery and the romance, I consider this story a humor piece.

I’m excited to have this one published.

Author Highlight: Dawn Chapman

April is here again. It’s my birthday month, and I’m celebrating with an author interview.

Dawn BookDawn Chapman is the author of The Secret King Series and Director of TSK Productions Ltd.

Do you write full-time or part-time?

It’s almost full time, even with a full time job. I work 7-3pm in the day as my paying job at the moment, and then from 4pm till 9pm I’m working on TSK’s projects.

Any tips on what to do and what not to do when writing?

Write what you want to. Don’t always try and please others. Get some beta readers you can trust and work had to keep them. If one person says something is wrong you can ignore it, but if 5 people say it… then think about what they’re saying.

Where is your favorite place to write?

A caravan site in Devon. 🙂 I’ve just come back from a weeks holiday there, the other half goes fishing, and I get to create in peace. Love it.

How often do you write, and do you have a special time during the day to write?

I would much prefer to write early, but if I’m off, I write all day. Sometimes 16 hours a day.

Do you work to an outline or plot or do you prefer just see where an idea takes you?

I’ve done both, as part of NaNoWriMo. In fact TSK’s first novel was on the fly. I hadn’t planned anything, and one of my TSK fans for the series, said ‘why don’t you try writing their story before they get to Earth’ and that was it, I thought why not, and I wrote my first 50k in the 30 days. The following 84k I wrote up till my birthday on the 13th december, and the rewriting took TSK’s first book to 103k.

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Dawn Chapman has been creating sci fi and fantasy stories for thirty years. Until 2005 when her life and attention turned to scripts, and she started work on The Secret King, a 13 episode Sci Fi TV series, with great passion for this medium.

In 2010, Dawn returned to her first love of prose. She’s been working with coach EJ Runyon who’s encouraged her away from fast paced script writing, to revel in the world of TSK and Letháo as an epic prose space journey.

Where TSK came from.

The Secret King began its journey in 2007 when I broke my hand. I had a dream and that dream became a feature script. I wanted to learn and find likeminded people, so I joined an online writing community, this is where I met one of TSK’s partners Steven Kogan and from that first rough draft of a feature film I began to plot a TV series. I asked Steven if he would like to write inside my world and he accepted, together we penned 13 episodes, and became fast friends over the next few years.

In 2010 I started entering competitions and discovering NaNoWriMo was where I found my second partner, Jaime Bengzon, who also came on board with TSK’s TV series as a character designer. In 2016 we made it official and formed TSK Productions, with the dream of novels, novellas, comics and animation in our sights.

To date the TSK team is 14 strong, and growing. And we just released our first two audioshorts from the series by the talented Holly Adams! –

 

Visit Dawn on her personal blog – kanundra.com — and —

 

Check out TSK on the following:

Websites –

Production Website –  www.tskproductions.com

Main TSK Website –  www.thesecretking.com

 

Twitter –

Production – https://twitter.com/ProductionsTSK

TSK – https://twitter.com/TeamSecretKing

 

Facebook –

TSK Productions Ltd –

https://www.facebook.com/TSKProductionsLtd

The Secret King Fan Page –

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Secret-King/836723299691777

Author Highlight: Corinne Morier

Coming up next in my author interviews is an author from one of my critique and feedback groups. She published her story Mother’s Gift appears in the anthology From the Stories of Old with my own short story Kris and Krampus.

CORINNE MORIER is a bibliophile-turned-writer with a penchant for writing stories that make readers think. In her free time, she enjoys blogging, playing video games, and swimming. Her motto is “Haters gonna hate and potatoes gonna potate.” You can keep up with her latest by following her blog at http://corinnemorier.wordpress.com/ or following her on Twitter at @cmauthor.

So Corinne, we met through a writing group called Just-Us League. What drew you to the group?beautiful-mermaids-1-free-wallpaper

I first connected with another member of the group, Elise Edmonds, and when she found out I was writing a mermaid novel, she recommended to Kristen, the leader, that I should join, and we’ve been inseparable ever since. And yet even though my entire reason for being friends with them in the first place is because Kristen has to read my mermaid novel, she’s not reading it. I like to say that I joined because of the mermaid novel that Kristen isn’t reading. xD

During your journey as a writer, is there anything you have learned that you would pass on to me and other beginning writers?

Ooh, so many things. I think I’ll keep it succinct and choose two specific ones. One, take your writing seriously. If it’s a hobby, then you just write whenever you have time. But if you want to make a career out of it, write every single day. No questions. Writers write. I have a 9-5 (well, technically, 8-4) job that keeps me really busy and on my feet all day long. I get home and I’m hella tired. But guess what I do when I get home? I change out of my work clothes, brew myself a cup of coffee, and sit my butt down at the computer and write, no matter how tired I am.

Another thing I’d like to share is just general advice. A lot of times in fiction writing books and on websites, other writers will tout rules at you: “Don’t ever use adverbs.” “First person POV doesn’t work.” “Never use a semicolon in dialogue.” But if you try and follow all these rules, you’ll never figure out what’s right for you, because these rules aren’t actually rules at all, just arbitrary guidelines. My favorite saying is “Rules that dictate how to write a novel exist, but no one knows what they are.” So define your own rules and discover your own style as you go.

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There seem to be many debates on the best way to approach writing. One of them is the great plotting/pantsing debate. What’s your opinion on this topic?

My opinion is that you have to figure out whatever works best for you. Some people love creating detailed outlines for their novels before sitting down to write. Others prefer “pantsing” (a term used in writing communities to describe someone who sets out to write a novel without knowing how it will end). I find that a mixture of the two works for me. Although I used to let plotting my novels fall by the wayside and just let the story go where it felt right, nowadays I’m more in the middle. I like to write a general one or two sentence summary per chapter of what happens during that chapter. For example “The prince and his father stop for the night, and his father reveals that he fears death.” so that I have a general idea of what will happen during that chapter. And it works a lot better for me than it used to. But then I go off of that one-sentence summary and write the chapter, and sometimes it goes in a different direction from what I had imagined. Like, the major plot-related event during the chapter stays the same, but maybe the way it happens is different. So there isn’t one hard and fast rule of “plotting vs. pantsing.” It’s Plotting is simply a tool, and writers can either use the tool or not, because sometimes a tool just isn’t right for a project.

What’s your current project(s)?

Right now I just finished a round of beta reviews on what I thought was book one of a fantasy trilogy, but those evil, lovely little betas suggested that the story is so complex that it could easily be multiple books. So now book one is getting split into three separate books, and my trilogy has become a quintet. I’m currently working on what is the new book one in this series, which is about a young Prince who loses his father unexpectedly and must finish what his father started, which is to ensure the safety of all his people before they are completely destroyed.

When/where can I look forward to reading your stories?

At this point, the book is still in its first draft. I’m posting it to Scribophile as I write, so Louise, you specifically can read it there, but for anyone else: I’m hoping to have the first draft finished by May of this year and then get it beta-read, professionally edited, etc. after that. I would love to have it finished in time for Christmas, but to be safe, I’m going to say early 2018–March, perhaps.
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For more tidbits on Corinne Morier, check her out at:

On her Blog

@ Twitter

Posting on Facebook

Performing on Youtube

Building a library through Goodreads

Birthdays

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Picture taken from PlusQuotes

My sister is having a birthday this month.Which got me thinking about birthdays in general.

When I am doing character development, I hardly ever give my characters a birthday, which is odd. So many things revolve around our birthdays like which year we start schooling, if our birthday parties were more outdoors like swimming or winter activities like skating. My sister almost always had her birthday out of school because of spring break, but I almost always had finals on my birthday because it is the last week in April. I have a friend whose birthday is two days after Christmas and she always felt like her family never celebrated her birthday. She always said people gave her whatever Christmas gift they didn’t want because it was free and easier than standing in the return line.

Anyway, on that thought, I’ve decided next set of characters I work on creating will have specific birth dates, not just a decade or year, but a specific date. I think that could create some interesting character traits.

 

Crawling out of the hole

I have been in a writing slump, but I am climbing out of the hole.

My in-real-life, writing guilt partner and I have drafted an outline together. Here’s the plan:

One week we will draft a planned scene.  We will each write the scene on our own. Then we post it to a shared cloud folder where the other person can read it.

At our weekly meeting, we discuss the scene. Weaknesses and strengths, the parts we like and weren’t fond of, and how we see our characters developing differently and how that may change what ultimately happens in the novel.

The second week, we make revisions and edit our scene and make sure we are both at a spot to continue toward the next scene from the outline.

Then at our meeting we discuss the revisions (if they were changes for the better or worse) and the goals for the next scene.

We have both drafted scene one at this point. We’ve discussed. I have made my revisions. Tomorrow at our meeting I’ll confirm if my guilt partner made his revisions. Then we will be on to writing chapter 2.

I’ll be interested to see how far this goes. I’d love to see the whole novel happen, but life happens.